jQuery

Home > jQuery

What is jQuery?

jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library. It makes things like HTML document traversal and manipulation, event handling, animation, and Ajax much simpler with an easy-to-use API that works across a multitude of browsers. With a combination of versatility and extensibility, jQuery has changed the way that millions of people write JavaScript.
Why we use jQuery?

Web developers use JavaScript every day to bring the necessary functionality to the websites they create. One particular tool that provide a great deal of power and flexibility is jQuery.

jQuery is a JavaScript library that helps to simplify and standardize interactions between JavaScript code and HTML elements. JavaScript allows websites to be interactive and dynamic, and jQuery is a tool that helps streamline that process. We are going to take a high level look at what that means, how it works, and why it is so useful.

History of HTML?

jQuery was originally created in January 2006 at BarCamp NYC by John Resig, influenced by Dean Edwards' earlier cssQuery library.It is currently maintained by a team of developers led by Timmy Willison (with the jQuery selector engine, Sizzle, being led by Richard Gibson).

jQuery was originally licensed under the CC BY-SA 2.5, and relicensed to the MIT license in 2006. At the end of 2006, it was dual-licensed under GPL and MIT licenses. As this led to some confusion, in 2012 the GPL was dropped and is now only licensed under the MIT license.

Version Of Jquery
responsive image

Jquery 1.0

Initial release:

August 26, 2006

responsive image

Jquery 2.0

Initial release:

April 18, 2013

responsive image

Jquery 3.0

Initial release:

June 9, 2016

Jquery 1.0

Version 1.0 was the first stable release of jQuery. This release supports older web browsers that aren't even supported by their respective developers any longer. If you expect a large amount of visitors with older web browsers, this would definitely be the version to go for.

Jquery 2.0

Versions 2.0 dropped support for Internet Explorer 6-8 to increase jQuery's overall performance and reduce the library's filesize. In simple words: Version 2.0 is faster and smaller in filesize than version 1.0, but it no longer supports older web browsers. Since Microsoft dropped the support for Windows XP, it's reasonably safe to assume that your visitors will be using a browser compatibile with version 2.0 unless you know beforehand this won't be the case (see version 1.0).

Jquery 3.0

With the release of version 3.0 both versions 1.11.1 and 2.1.1 will be upgraded to jQuery Compat 3.0 and jQuery 3.0. jQuery Compat 3.0 will still support older browsers like Internet Explorer 8 while the regular version 3.0 will only support evergreen browsers (the current and previous versions of a specific browser).

Future Of Jquery

JQuery is a very solid, well-supported library that is extremely popular. It is used a lot in conjunction with transpiled languages to do front-end web development (because JavaScript is a dysfunctional programming language and the JS web framework landscape is a chaotic mess). It’s not going away anytime soon. But it will become less relevant as JavaScript becomes less relevant with the eventual advent of WebAssembly. Nothing lasts forever and in time, even the web browser will go away, and along with it, HTML, CSS and the DOM.

Copyright © Webstore All Rights Reserved.